Communication these days?

How do you communicate with your friends these days, mostly in person, mostly online, mostly calls, mostly texts, apps? Don’t lie.

Movies like Wall-E have commented about our lack of physical interaction and our future to come. Scientific studies have proved that we are social creatures of the physical world, yet social media of the digital world has been changing what it means to socially interact. This with technology have been making it easier to tap in and out of the Facebook, Twitter, Google plus and what not and we can talk to these sites to talk to our friends via speech recognition forgetting that a simple phone call can get you an immediate response.

I admit that I am a texter because it ironically frees up my time as opposed to phone calls which i invest more of my time into. Besides our insane amount of time on the computer or texting, the latest subject of discussion that has been brought up is, “emoji overuse” as I prefer to call it.

I’ve also noticed that sites such as Facebook force emoji use whether or not you type a face or pick a face from a gallery of images.

 

This lovely article on Mashable discusses the the use of emoji through the years. I remember the days when they were called “emoticons” and the difference between emoticons and emoji’s being pixel versus a more rendered face. I personally find the emoji’s odd looking myself, but for they cutely convey expressions people are feeling.

Emoji’s are considered something used mostly by females and the younger generations. There have been surveys and studies saying the more emotional you are as a person the more likely you will use emojis to express those feelings in text, and the condensed faces are connected to young folk who simultaneously abbreviate their words as well.

Why Mashable and myself find this so concerning is because emojis are meant for light playful use in certain situations. But according the writer’s personal anecdote of using emjoi’s to express their sadness of their friend moving rather than calling their friend to talk personally.

This casual substitution brings a more stunning realization about blasé treatment of situations not meant to be taken lightly.

Our generation is coming out with these amazing technological revolutions such as Google Glass and smart watches that make communication easily accessible but a lot less personal.

 

http://mashable.com/2014/07/09/emoji-linguists-communication/

 

 

 

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Woman-Owned Businesses

American Express OPEN taking special interest in the benchmarks reached by women-owned businesses and tasked itself with spreading the findings of its studies to encourage and enable women to put business plans in motion. Understanding how woman business owners are finding success is an important part of further growth. Below are some facts about women-owned businesses, complemented by tips and insights from successful female entrepreneurs.

Taken from (http://mashable.com/2012/08/14/facts-women-business/)

1. In the past 15 years, the number of women-owned businesses grew by 54%; there are now 8.3 million women-owned businesses in the United States.

“It’s so essential for business owners to have a financial plan. Often, business owners invest their own savings in order to increase their ultimate earning potential. Because of this, it’s extra important for you to have a personal plan for your own money and to establish your boundaries -– when you will and won’t do something. I think all too often people don’t have a plan -– and not having a plan actually is a plan, it’s just a really bad one! People don’t know what they don’t know, so it’s critical to talk to someone and enlist expertise from others.” — Alexa Von Tobel, LearnVest

2. Despite owning nearly 30% of U.S. businesses, women attract only 5% of the nation’s equity capital. When it comes to first-year funding, women receive 80% less capital than men.

“I went out to SXSW knowing that all the investors I knew -– that they would all be there for the week and I could catch up with them all face to face. And I started with the people that knew me best asking if they would invest, or did they know someone they could introduce me to who could invest.

“Within 12 weeks I closed a round of nearly a quarter million. When all was said and done, I raised over $2 million in capital from investors. Not knowing how to do that and approaching that for the first time was a real challenge.” — Laura Fitton, oneforty

For more facts about women-owned businesses go to Click here