The NEW 4 P’s of Marketing Mix

The NEW 4 P’s of Marketing

 

You might not be aware of the classic 4 P’s of marketing, also known as the marketing mix: price, product, promotion, and place. The Marketing mix; a quick way marketing professionals keep in mind the four major considerations for a brand.

<goElaborate Pinterest Infograph

But the fact is that things change.  The drastic changes with technology, especially via social media and mobile technology, e.g: smart phones, simply cannot be ignored.

The new ‘P’s’ of marketing, as Kimberley Kadlec, Vice-President of Johnson & Johnson’s global marketing group suggested are: Purpose, Presence, Proximity and Partnership.  (http://bit.ly/XuMWT8)

Purpose adds to the value, such as an environmental purpose (Ex: 10% of our revenue goes to WWF), and transparency (Ex: Dolphin-safe fishing).

Proximity and Presence addresses the social and mobile issue.  The brand needs to be accessible everywhere: Google, Facebook, Youtube, and everything else you can think of.

Partnership focuses on collaboration with both businesses and clients to advance the brand.  Be it looking at the feedback of customers or sponsoring events to gain further exposure.

Brands both new and old must consider the new variables in this digital age, and it all begins with the new P’s of marketing.

Top 5 Free Tools for Creating Hot Infographic

Information graphics (AKA: Infograpgic)

bring in the most users and attraction to your brand with users having diminishing attention spans, bright messages with clearly-displayed nuggets of information allow straight to the point message with real eye-catching statistics.

The biggest websites are already creating different categories of infographics on Pinterest and Twitter. So get up on the wagon and go for the ride.  It does not take a lot to start creating your own infographics within minutes.

Top 5 Free Tools for Creating Hot Infographic:5 Free Tools for Creating Hot Infographic

Hohli is an intuitive and simple online chart maker. Charts are also very well designed and look awesome!

Many EyesIBM research venture lets you upload your documents and visualize the modifications you can make to make it more attractive. You can select from template formats or customize your own changes. Nice!

Visual.ly If you think that vibrant colors and attractive images will work best for your document, pay a visit to the Visual.ly website and be amazed by the number of stunning visuals.

Inkscape is a free vector graphic software available for many platforms. You will have no problems importing your visualisations and combining them with other visuals to create your masterpiece.

Gapminder “There’s nothing boring about statistics!” Documents about current world affairs, dealing chiefly with statistics, can be really spiced up with the Gapminder cross platform tool. A Adobe Air application returns your document with extremely eye-catching visual stats.

The six most transformative in online marketing.

Taken from Adweek.com.
Written by Anthony Ha.

A vast array of technologies and trends are transforming online marketing. Because it’s hard to wade through the changes, we’ve whittled them down to six that are significant.

The death of the click through—maybe for real this time. Advertisers and publishers have been predicting—and hoping for—the death of the click-through rate for years, complaining it’s a highly inefficient way to measure an ad’s success, especially for brand advertising. Click throughs aren’t dead yet, but efforts like startup Moat’s “Kill the Click” campaign, which focuses on time spent mousing over an ad rather than clicking, should help dig its grave.

The merging of mobile and desktop. The dividing line between mobile devices (especially tablets) and desktop/laptop computers seems to be blurring. Apple, for example, has been incorporating features from its smartphones into its desktop operating system, and Jefferies & Co. predicted recently that Apple’s two systems—OSX and iOS—will merge completely. Meanwhile, ad servers like Google’s DoubleClick are trying to integrate their desktop and mobile offerings.

The persistence of supercookies. Researchers have found that major websites—specifically Hulu and MSN.com—have been following visitors with a file called a “supercookie,” which continues its tracking even after users delete it in their Web browsers. Not surprisingly, this doesn’t go over well with consumers. When called out, Microsoft and Hulu apologized and claimed to stop the practice. Don’t look for them to disappear completely, though—supercookies are legal.

The beginnings of ad-tech consolidation. Earlier this year, Andrew Bloom, vice president of business development at MediaMind, said, “The notion of consolidation is a wet dream for people in the industry.” And the dream may have started, sparked in part by Google’s acquisition in June of AdMeld. The latest deal came in September, when ContextWeb and Datran Media merged to create PulsePoint, which promises an easier way to create cross-channel campaigns.

The rise of HTML5. Once a dominant format on the Web, Adobe’s Flash has struggled to stay relevant, especially after Apple declined to support the format on the iPhone and iPad. Publishers and advertisers have shifted their attention to the newer, more mobile-compatible technology, HTML5. Even Adobe, which continues to defend Flash’s usefulness for games and other applications, has announced a separate product to help designers build ads in HTML5.

The value of specialized content. According to ad intelligence company SQAD, the CPMs paid for display ads held relatively steady over the past year, but things get more complicated when you compare different categories. Entertainment and finance sites saw their average CPMs increase by 50 cents or more, while automotive, lifestyle, and home/fashion sites went down by at least the same margin. SQAD’s conclusion? Specialized content still makes money.